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Psychological

Developing Mental Illness after a Brain Injury

Brain injury is a known risk factor for developing a mental illness, while some people with brain injury will have a pre-existing mental illness. Either way, dealing with both can cause additional stress for the person and their family after a brain injury.

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Psychological

Stress, Anxiety and Brain Injury

While stress is part of everyday life and a natural reaction when major change occurs, its impact can be much greater following brain injury.

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Physical

Communication Disorders After a Brain Injury

A brain injury can affect a person’s ability to communicate by impairing their hearing, speech and cognitive processing.

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Psychological

Brain injury and Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)

While the general effects of brain injury can often include a level emotional distress, affecting your ongoing health and well-being, it’s not uncommon for people with a brain injury to experience more specific symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

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Cognitive

Problems with Organising

Most people with an ABI will initially find some difficulty with prioritising, sequencing,organising, starting, and completing tasks.

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Behavioural

Domestic violence

Challenging behaviours after a brain injury can sometimes lead to domestic violence within a family.

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Behavioural

Impaired Awareness

Lack of self-awareness is a common outcome for people who sustain brain injuries with frontal lobe damage. Their inability to self-monitor and self-correct behaviour can lead to challenging behaviours.

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Behavioural

Self-centredness

The ability to view the world from someone else’s point of view is a very complex cognitive skill that occurs in the frontal lobes of the brain. This is a very common area to be affected in a brain injury and other brain disorders which can cause self-centered behaviour.

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Behavioural

Impulsive behaviour

Injury to the frontal lobes after a traumatic brain injury (TBI) can affect the area of the brain that normally controls our impulses.

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Behavioural

Anger

Anger is a common emotional response after a brain injury and can be directly related to impairments caused by the injury.

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Psychological

Brain injury and suicide risks

People with an acquired brain injury may be at risk of suicide at some stage of their recovery process.  It is very important for family members and friends to recognise the danger signs, know how to help and who to turn to for advice or referral. 

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Psychological

Clinical Depression

Clinical depression is a serious disorder that impacts on a person physically, emotionally and even cognitively - slowing thought processes and reducing the ability to concentrate.

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Psychological

Panic Attacks

Panic attacks occur when the body reacts as if it is in immense danger in a situation where most people would not be afraid.

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Physical

Sexual changes

Acquired brain injury (ABI) can have a number of consequences for an individual's sexual functioning. Talking about sex can be embarrassing, but it is important for the person with brain injury and their loved ones to discuss the various issues.

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Physical

Hearing Impairment After a Brain Injury

A brain injury can damage both mechanical and neurological processes and result in a variety of hearing difficulties.

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Physical

Balance problems and dizziness

Dizziness and balance problems are common after a brain injury. This can result in problems with movement even when there is no loss of function in the limbs themselves.

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Physical

Sensory and perceptual problems

Sensory and perceptual problems can arise from damage to the right side of the brain or the parietal and occipital lobes of the brain.

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Physical

Epilepsy and Other Seizures

Epilepsy is recurring brief episodes of abnormal electrical activity in the brain leading to uncontrolled convulsions and unconsciousness, or a momentary loss of awareness.

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Physical

Headaches

Headaches are a common and often persistent problem after acquiring a brain injury.  Headaches can arise after damage to different structures both inside and outside the head.

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Physical

Sleep Issues

Lack of sleep has a negative effect on our cognition, mood, energy levels and appetite. The average person needs eight hours of sleep a night or will suffer from decreased concentration, energy and many other problems. These effects are multiplied many times by a traumatic brain injury, stroke and other types of brain disorder.

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Physical

Managing fatigue

Fatigue is a common and very disabling symptom experienced by people with a brain injury.

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Cognitive

Motivation and initiation (Adynamia)

Some brain injuries can result in a loss of motivation and difficulty in getting started with activities.

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Cognitive

Decision-making and Brain Injury

Decision-making is one element of a broader set of mental skills that have been called 'executive functions' - these are the skills needed to enable us to deal with problems that arise in everyday life, and to cope with new situations.

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Cognitive

Perseveration (Repetition)

Perseveration is repetitive and continuous behavior, speech or thought that occurs due to changes in cognitive skills such as memory, attention, and mental flexibility.

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Cognitive

Memory Problems and Tips

Short-term memory loss is very common after a brain injury – thankfully there are plenty of coping strategies available. Typical situations include forgetting people's names, losing a train of thought, getting lost at the shops, repeating or forgetting past conversations, misplacing objects and difficulty learning new skills. 

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Cognitive

Attention and concentration problems

A brain injury can affect attention or concentration abilities, leading to problems with work, study and everyday living.

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